Centos7 Nginx Php-Fpm Sock


CentOS7 Nginx Php-Fpm Sock

What is CentOS?

CentOS (Community ENTerprise Operating System) is a Linux distribution that provides a free, enterprise-class, community-supported computing platform functionally compatible with its upstream source, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). CentOS is one of the most popular Linux distributions and can be deployed in various ways, such as in physical, virtual, and cloud environments. The most recent version of CentOS is 7, which was released 2014. It can be used to power systems of all sizes, ranging from small personal computers to some of the most powerful supercomputers in the world.

What is Nginx?

Nginx (pronounced engine-x) is a web server that was developed by Igor Sysoev in 2004. It is an open source software and is the software that currently powers 28.8% of active websites on the Internet. Nginx is a lightweight web server, but is also capable of acting as a reverse proxy, load balancer, mail proxy, and HTTP cache. It is often used in combination with other software such as Apache, PHP-FPM (FastCGI Process Manager), and MYSQL to power dynamic content websites. Nginx has several features to help improve scalability and performance, such as support for web sockets, asynchronous disk I/O, multiple threads, and a streamlined architecture.

What is PHP-FPM?

PHP-FPM (FastCGI Process Manager) is a server process manager for PHP that allows you to manage multiple processes and resources. It is an advanced version of the traditional PHP SAPI (Server Application Programming Interface). PHP-FPM is highly optimized and makes it easier to run and scale heavy PHP applications while reducing the resource consumption of the machine running the software. It also uses a fewer number of processes, helps increase connection throughput, offloads disk I/O, and can provide increased security. PHP-FPM is supported by both Apache and Nginx, and is included as a package in some Linux distributions.

What is a PHP Sock?

A PHP sock is a Unix domain socket that is used by the PHP-FPM to communicate with the web server, allowing Nginx or Apache to process requests from a web page, such as loading a page, or submitting a form. The PHP sock is a bi-directional stream, so the web server can send a request and the PHP-FPM process can respond back with the result. It is best practice to have a separate PHP sock for each user on the server, to ensure only the correct user can access the particular PHP-FPM process. It is also good practice to have a separate PHP sock for each different version of PHP that is running on the server.

What Is the Advantage of Using This Setup?

Using Nginx, PHP-FPM, and a PHP sock is an efficient way of serving web pages and applications. Nginx is a streamlined and lightweight web server, which can handle a large number of requests quickly and efficiently. PHP-FPM allows the web server to offload some of the resource-intensive features of processing dynamic web requests, freeing up the server and allowing it to serve other requests faster. PHP-FPM also offers support for web sockets and asynchronous disk I/O, allowing for more rapid and efficient data transmission. Additionally, by using a separate PHP sock for each user, the system is more secure and prevents malicious users from accessing resources they are not authorized to access.

How Do I Setup CentOS7 Nginx, PHP-FPM and a PHP Sock?

First, you will need to install Nginx and PHP on your server. Nginx can be installed with the command, “yum install nginx”, followed by “systemctl start nginx”. PHP can be installed with the command “yum install php-fpm”, followed by “systemctl start php-fpm”. Once these are installed, you will need to configure Nginx to point to the correct PHP-FPM socket. This is done by editing the “sites-available/default” file and adding the “fastcgi_pass” entry, followed by the path to the PHP-FPM socket.

Finally, you will need to create a separate PHP socket for each user that is connecting to the server. This is done by editing the “/etc/php-fpm.d/www.conf” file and setting the “listen” option for each user. Once this is done, the server will be ready to start processing requests using the new Nginx, PHP-FPM, and PHP sock setup.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is Nginx?

A: Nginx (pronounced engine-x) is a web server that was developed by Igor Sysoev in 2004. It is an open source software and is the software that currently powers 28.8% of active websites on the Internet.

Q: What is PHP-FPM?

A: PHP-FPM (FastCGI Process Manager) is a server process manager for PHP that allows you to manage multiple processes and resources. It is an advanced version of the traditional PHP SAPI (Server Application Programming Interface).

Q: What is a PHP sock?

A: A PHP sock is a Unix domain socket that is used by the PHP-FPM to communicate with the web server, allowing Nginx or Apache to process requests from a web page, such as loading a page, or submitting a form.

Q: What is the advantage of using this setup?

A: Using Nginx, PHP-FPM, and a PHP sock is an efficient way of serving web pages and applications. Nginx is a streamlined and lightweight web server, which can handle a large number of requests quickly and efficiently. PHP-FPM allows the web server to offload some of the resource-intensive features of processing dynamic web requests, freeing up the server and allowing it to serve other requests faster.

Conclusion

CentOS 7, Nginx, PHP-FPM, and a PHP sock are a powerful combination of technologies that allow web servers to serve dynamic content quickly and efficiently. The technologies are easy to install, configure, and manage, and offer a number of advantages over traditional web servers. By using a separate PHP sock for each user, the system is more secure and prevents malicious users from accessing resources they are not authorized to access. If you are looking for an efficient way to serve dynamic content, then CentOS 7, Nginx, PHP-FPM, and the PHP sock are a great choice.

Thank you for reading this article. Please check out our other articles to learn more about CentOS, Nginx, PHP-FPM, and how to use them together.